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Online Fraud Detection, Cyber Security: Cerber Surpasses Locky to Become Dominant Ransomware Menace

Ransomware-as-a-Service is a hit with the tech illiterate

 

Cerber eclipsed Locky as the most common ransomware pathogen doing the rounds in the first three months of 2017.

 

Cerber's control of the cybercrime market rose from 70 per cent market share in January to 87 per cent in March, according to the latest cybercrime tactics report by Malwarebytes Lab.

 

The success of Cerber is down to its features (robust encryption, offline encryption etc) combined with the adoption of a Ransomware-as-a-Service business model, whereby the ransomware can be modified or leased. "It's also very easy for non-technical criminals to get their hands on a customised version of the ransomware," Malwarebytes reports.

 

Malwarebytes' findings follow reports from Microsoft that Cerber was topping its Windows 10 ransomware chart.

 

By contrast, the Locky ransomware (last year's number one) has dropped off the map, likely due to a switch in tactics by the cybercrooks behind the Necurs spam botnet.

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Online Security SWIFT to Introduce Tool to Spot Fraudulent Inter-Bank Messages

Interbank messaging service SWIFT, which is used to transfer trillions of dollars between banks every day, will launch a new tool to spot fraudulent messages, seeking to restore trust in the system after millions of dollars were stolen in cyber raids.

 

Belgium-based SWIFT said on Wednesday that it will offer clients a service that will be able to learn a user bank's messaging patterns so that it can spot if a payment is being made to an unusual counterparty or for an unusual amount.

 

Last year $81 million was stolen from Bangladesh's central bank after thieves hacked into its SWIFT system and sent instructions to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York to pay money from Bangladesh Bank's account to parties in Asia.

 

SWIFT was criticised last year by some users and industry players for failing to beef up security on its system even as the risk of cyber-attacks increased and the network expanded to include smaller institutions with more lax security procedures.

 

Though SWIFT l

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Security and Risk Complaints Online - Payday lender Wonga admits to data breach

270,000 customers advised not to worry but also to watch out for odd transactions and ponder password refresh

Payday lender Wonga has advised 270,000 customers of a data breach and offered inconsistent advice about the severity of the incident and how to respond.

An “incident FAQ” on the company's site says “We believe there may have been illegal and unauthorized access to the personal data of some of our customers.” The Reg understands 270,000 customers are potentially at risk, 245,000 of them in the UK.

Wonga says the data that parties unknown have accessed “may have included one or more of the following: name, e-mail address, home address, phone number, the last four digits of your card number (but not the whole number) and/or your bank account number and sort code.”

The FAQ offers contradictory advice on the incident, offering assurances that “We believe that your account is secure and you do not need to take any action" but also says “if you are concerned you should change you

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Security and Risk Complains Online : Elbit's Cyberbit Hones Military Technology for Commercial

RAANANA, Israel (Reuters) - Israeli defense Electronics Company Elbit Systems forecasts double-digit growth for its Cyberbit business, which is transforming the technology it has long provided for military intelligence to the fast-growing commercial market. Cyberbit took shape after Elbit's $150 million acquisition of the cyber and intelligence unit of Israel's Nice Systems in 2015, blending Nice's technology designed for law enforcement and intelligence agencies with Elbit's military-focused capabilities.

 

Today Cyberbit operates as two companies - one focused on government security and intelligence and subject to Israeli export restrictions, the other catering for the commercial market, mainly financial firms and utilities. Both are headed by Cyberbit Chief Executive Adi Dar.

 

 

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A massive failure that leaves iPhones, Android mobes open to tracking

Security flaws smash worthless privacy protection

 

Analysis To protect mobile devices from being tracked as they move through Wi-Fi-rich environments, there's a technique known as MAC address randomization. This replaces the number that uniquely identifies a device's wireless hardware with randomly generated values.

 

In theory, this prevents scumbags from tracking devices from network to network, and by extension the individuals using them, because the devices in question call out to these nearby networks using different hardware identifiers.

 

It's a real issue because stores can buy Wi-Fi equipment that logs smartphones' MAC addresses, so that shoppers are recognized by their handheld when they next walk in, or walk into affiliate shop with the same creepy system present. This could be used to alert assistants, or to follow people from department to department, store to store, and then sell that data to marketers and ad companies.

 

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ONLINE SECURITY - CYBER RANSOMING A GROWING PARASITICAL BUSINESS FOR UK HACKERS

'There are minimal overheads and profits can be limitless'

 

Cybercriminals are increasingly targeting UK workers files and data, and the Metropolitan Police have warned that “no one is safe”.

 

The FBI, Metropolitan Police, and security experts all agree that cyber ransoming has fast become one of UK’s biggest economic crimes.

 

Unpredictable, unstoppable and potentially fatal to a business, the rapid emergence of ransomware has become a threat to people across the nation.

 

August Graham, the editor of the Sentinel, arrived at work one morning last summer to find a note pop up on one of the computer screens. It informed him that all the files on the firm’s server had been encrypted and were being held ransom.

 

He was told he had to pay £500 to get them back, or they'd be destroyed.

 

Last year, 54 per cent of businesses in the UK were hit by ransomware attacks, according to a survey by Osterman Research on behalf of Malwarebytes. In 20 per cent of the cases, it stopped b

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Easy Ways To Protect Your Privacy On Google Chrome

Internet world is not secure at all. You need to be extra careful while accessing internet. Google knows more about you and understands how critical is your web security. You don’t know, people can track each and every click you make on the web if you are not going through the right security measures, especially your bank account details which you generally share through your google gmail account or any website you use, in which you share your highly important business information.

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IRS Dirty Dozen Phishing, Phone Cons and Identity Theft Lead Scam List For 2017

“This is one of the most dangerous email phishing scams we’ve seen in a long time. It can result in the large-scale theft of sensitive data that criminals can use to commit various crimes, including filing fraud  tax returns. We need everyone’s help to turn the tide against this scheme,’’ said IRS Commissioner John Koskinen in a statement.

 

 

In addition the latest Phishing Trends and Intelligence Report, which has data about January 2016, says that the IRS phishing sites spotted in that one month totaled more than the IRS phishing attempts seen during all of the previous year. While the numbers for January aren’t in yet, PhishLabs researchers expect yet another spike.

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IRS Dirty Dozen Phishing, Phone Cons and Identity Theft Lead Scam List For 2017

The Internal Revenue Service rounded up some of the usual suspects in its annual look at the Dirty Dozen scams you need to watch out for this year.

 

“This is one of the most dangerous email phishing scams we’ve seen in a long time. It can result in the large-scale theft of sensitive data that criminals can use to commit various crimes, including filing fraud  tax returns. We need everyone’s help to turn the tide against this scheme,’’ said IRS Commissioner John Koskinen in a statement.

 

In addition the latest Phishing Trends and Intelligence Report, which has data about January 2016, says that the IRS phishing sites spotted in that one month totaled more than the IRS phishing attempts seen during all of the previous year. While the numbers for January aren’t in yet, PhishLabs researchers expect yet another spike.

 

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Cyber Security on February means romance...and romance scams: BBB offers tips to avoid

As the month when Valentine's Day falls on the calendar, February has a reputation for being "prime time" for romance. It's also definitely a time when scammers seek to prey on those searching for romantic interests online. Better Business Bureau of Minnesota and North Dakota (BBB) advises people to proceed with caution before they let their hearts—and their finances—get tangled up in a romance scheme.

 

 

Romance scams can happen to anyone. You meet someone who seems like a match online, you get to know them, and everything appears to be going well; however, you aren't able to meet in person for some reason (due to issues they claim such as distance, military deployment, work travel, etc.). Then suddenly your online love interest claims they're in desperate straits and asks you to wire money, or says they can come to meet you but need you to wire funds for the airline ticket. Be aware that these are classic signs of a romance scam, and if you dip into your own pockets once, he or s

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